Monday, April 23, 2018

Marge Piercy's "Liminal Trash" #Poemaday #NationalPoetryMonth

--from the archives of The Broadkill Review
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Knopf brought out Marge Piercy’s 19th poetry book Made in Detroit in March 2015. The Hunger Moon: New & Selected Poems was released in paperback. Piercy has published 17 novels, most recently Sex Wars. PM Press published her short story collection The Cost of Lunch, Etc; the paperback will be out in the fall with new stories and an introduction, along with My Life, My Body (essays and poems).  Her work has been translated into nineteen languages.

Liminal trash

Ridiculous objects I can’t throw away
because they conjure up a person,
a time, a place, an era of my past:
how they clutter my drawers.

I don’t really need them to stir
memory, yet they’re precious if
only to me.  It’s as if I fear losing
some part of myself if I discard

them.  About clothes I’m never
sentimental, but these Apache tears
picked up in the desert decades
ago by a wanted fugitive; these faded

blue feathers of a mojo a dear poet
and friend gave me for protection;
this glass necklace with an eye;
this tiny china cat with one paw

broken off –they’re what’s left of dead
or lost friends and lovers, brother—
as if some ghostly piece of them
lingers still safe in my drawer.

--Marge Piercy

Sunday, April 22, 2018

Elisavietta Ritchie’s "We Wake Beside an Invisible River" #Poemaday #NationalPoetryMonth

--from the archives of The Broadkill Review
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We Wake Beside an Invisible River


Fog swishing through Georgia pines
screens our world inside a Japanese dawn,
veils deer among flowering quince.

Yet through the scrim of mists
we see the Buddha at Kamakura,
small deer we fed at Nara,

cormorants with rings
around their throats bringing fish
to skiffs in the Inland Sea.

When mists clear we will see Fujiyama
surrounded by sapphire waves
and crowned with perpetual snows—

No. The tardy sun burns this day
clear over our own graygreen cove
were tide now covers marsh and sand.

Our great blue heron proclaims
longevity over cattails and huge pink
marshmallow flowers edging the cove,

the cormorant only passing through dives
for minnows then, perched on a piling, swallows,
airs his long narrow wings, and dives…

The far river banks are fringed with bent oaks,
fields of soybeans, corn and ebony steers
grazing beside the Patuxent river….

One crane still flies against the misty red sun
over a rice padi, pink petals, skinny reeds,
on an antique scroll on our Maryland wall.



Elisavietta Ritchie’s stories, poems, articles, photographs are widely published, anthologized, translated. Recent books: Babushka’s Beads: A Geography of Genes; Guy Wires; Tiger Upstairs on Connecticut Avenue; Feathers, Or, Love on the Wing; Cormorant Beyond the Compost, Arc of the Storm, Elegy for the Other Woman. Flying Time: Stories & Half-Stories; In Haste I Write You This Note: Stories & Half-Stories. An updated e-book version of In Haste I Write You This Note: Stories & Half-Stories, a winner of the Writers' Publishing House Premiere Fiction prize and first came out in a print edition in 2000, is now available. She is ex-president Washington Writers’ Publishing House. 

Saturday, April 21, 2018

Jene Erick Beardsley's "Landscape" #poemaday #NationalPoetryMonth


LANDSCAPE

At the edge of town, main street widens to a highway,
The highway climbs a hill, and from the hill’s bare top
The motorist sees what looks like a factory in the distance,
To its rear perhaps the digs the tired workers
Go back home to for the night.  Seen more closely further on,
The factory is the maternity wing of the town’s brick hospital
That careless planning had backed against the tombs of an old graveyard.
Intrigued by this precarious adjacency,
The wayward thoughts fatigue and routine-driving host
Sober at what an inferior product the living body is,
How doomed to damage, quick to sickness, available for dying,
How short in contrast to its longings, and how strange
That hour by hour the world continues to produce it.


Jene Erick Beardsley was born and raised in Mount Vernon, New York.  He graduated from the University of Illinois with an MA in English Literature and for over thirty-five years taught poetry at a small college in the Philadelphia suburbs.  His poems have appeared in Verse Daily, Amherst Review, Sojourners, Fulcrum, Haight Ashbury Literary Journal, Green Mountains Review, Lullwater Review, South Carolina Review, Ibbetson Street Press, New Ohio Review, California Quarterly, Tribeca Review, New Letters, and many others.

--from the archives of The Broadkill Review
Visit us at our new home  broadkillreview.com
Support us by purchasing a title from the Broadkill River Press, co-sponsor of the Dogfish Head Poetry Prize.
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Friday, April 20, 2018

Jim Bourey's "Maple Butter" #poemaday #NationalPoetryMonth

Maple Butter

It was homemade
Maple butter
And the knife was made by her
Grandfather years ago
When he first came to Vermont
Before the fires
Before the war
Before she was born
Long ago

Learning how to make maple butter
Was an easy thing
Easier than knives
Easier than farming
Killing chickens
Throwing bales
Burying babies
And she made a fresh batch every spring
After the sap was cooked down
And the syrup was put up
Only missed a couple years
The ones with the burials

We ate the toast and sipped warm cider
She told the same stories
Same as last year
And years before
Our visits were predictable
We always ate toast
With maple butter
Drank warm cider
My only gift to her was bread
Though I sometimes changed a light bulb
Or brought in firewood

It was the least I could do


Jim Bourey is a certified senior citizen, a retired plumbing and heating wholesale manager and lifelong student of poetry.  His work has appeared in Fourth Coast Arts Magazine and “Said & Unsaid” an anthology from Winding Road Press in Marietta, GA.  He lives in Dover, DE with his wife Linda but he spends an inordinate amount of time at a cabin on the Deer River in northern New York State.

--from the archives of The Broadkill Review
Visit us at our new home  broadkillreview.com
Support us by purchasing a title from the Broadkill River Press, co-sponsor of the Dogfish Head Poetry Prize.
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Thursday, April 19, 2018

@MarkDanowsky 's "Underwater Photography" #poemaday #NationalPoetryMonth


Underwater Photography

I don’t really know what I’m looking at
or why I am looking at it
but I go on looking
longer than expected
It’s not the vivid colors
foreign tissues
glowing geometric abstractions
like organs
seen through translucent sheens
we shouldn’t be able to see

—it’s light
we share with those
who have none




Mark Danowsky’s poetry has appeared in Cordite, Grey Sparrow, Mobius, Right Hand Pointing, Shot Glass Journal, Third Wednesday and elsewhere. Mark is originally from the Philadelphia area, but currently resides in North-Central West Virginia. He works for a private detective agency and is Managing Editor for the Schuylkill Valley Journal.


--from the archives of The Broadkill Review
Visit us at our new home  broadkillreview.com
Support us by purchasing a title from the Broadkill River Press, co-sponsor of the Dogfish Head Poetry Prize.
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Wednesday, April 18, 2018

@aligizakis ' "Burden" #Poemaday "NationalPoetryMonth"

Burden

He put his bag on the floor
lied next to me
he raised one leg and
leaned it against the wall
as though to leave on it
a fleshy mark
a faint human trace
the other leg was resting
on the cool cement

suddenly as though he remembered
something very important

he got up
walked to the table
leaned down and smelt
the last bloomed rose
then he let a sigh float
in the darkened room
as though to release
burden of his last breath
and without any word
he collapsed on cool cement

---Manolis Aligizakis


Manolis (Emmanuel Aligizakis) was born in the small village Kolibari west of Chania on the Greek island of Crete in 1947. At a young age his family moved first to Thessaloniki and then to Athens where he was educated, achieving a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Sciences at the Panteion University of Athens. He has written three novels, a large number of collections of poetry, which are slowly appearing as published works. Various articles, poems and short stories in Greek as well as in English have appeared in various magazines and news papers in Canada, United States, Australia and Greece


--from the archives of The Broadkill Review
Visit us at our new home  broadkillreview.com
Support us by purchasing a title from the Broadkill River Press, co-sponsor of the Dogfish Head Poetry Prize.
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Tuesday, April 17, 2018

@valca85 's "Breaking Time" #Poemaday #NationalPoetryMonth

 Breaking Time

Requesting the world to end
at that moment did not seem
like such a heavy thing to ask.
He paced on a beach
somewhere he couldn’t pronounce
and dreamed of an ocean of minutes,
each one overtaking the next.

--Valentina Cano


Valentina Cano is a student of classical singing who spends her free time writing or reading. Her work has appeared in journals such as Exercise Bowler, Blinking Cursor, Theory Train, The Black Fox Literary Magazine to name just a few.  Her poetry has been nominated for Best of the Web and the Pushcart Prize.

--from the archives of The Broadkill Review
Visit us at our new home  broadkillreview.com
Support us by purchasing a title from the Broadkill River Press, co-sponsor of the Dogfish Head Poetry Prize.
Connect with us on Twitter .